Blog

My Great-Grandfather's Death Certificate Lead To My HHT Diagnosis

My great-grandfather, Benjiman Grimmett, struggled with bleeding problems all of his life. However, bleeding was not an abnormal occurrence to my great-grandfather. Benjiman’s mother also suffered from horrible nosebleeds, and bleeding was a normal thing in the Grimmett family. Even though my great-grandfather suffered from nosebleeds all of his life, as he became older his bleeding worsened. By the time he reached his seventies he began to require blood transfusions. His bleeding became worse and worse, and in 1974, at the age of 79, he passed away from the consequences of internal bleeding. My grandfather and father also inherited this bleeding condition and continued to live with the annoying daily nosebleeds. Read More...

Be part of Cancer Research Today for a Cancer-Free Tomorrow

Cancer is a word heard too often here at LifeShare Blood Centers and in our community. That is why we are fighting back against this disease with the American Cancer Society by encouraging you to consider taking part in the Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3). Knowing the importance of cancer research, LifeShare has agreed to be a promotional partner for the study in the North Louisiana area. We are extending this message to encourage everyone in the area to be a Community Champion and/or enroll in the study. Read More...

Blood Makes A Difference

Dantrell K. Howard was first diagnosed with Sickle Cell Anemia at 8 years old by her sister who was going to school during that time to become a phlebotomist. “We always wondered why I would get so lethargic as a kid. I would get real bad stomach aches and fever,” says Dantrell. After being diagnosed, Dantrell began receiving treatment at LSU Medical Center in Shreveport; LifeShare, through local donors, is the exclusive supplier of blood to LSUMC – Shreveport. Blood and exchange transfusions help Dantrell manage this disease and improve her quality of life. “After receiving blood,” Dantrell says, “I’m ready to do whatever. I have so much energy.” Read More...

In Honor and Memory of I. Sackman "Sack" Marx

Serving his country and community throughout his life, LifeShare Blood Centers honors I. Sackman “Sack” Marx. A decorated war hero, pilot and World War II concentration camp survivor, Mr. Marx became a regular blood donor in the 1940s as a result of his own life being saved. He continued to give much of himself and his resources to support the community’s blood center through 2012. Read More...

In Honor and Memory of Marvin H. Easley

The unexpected news of Marvin Easley’s passing brings with it a combination of sorrowful thoughts and grateful memories at LifeShare Blood Centers. An accomplished professional, Mr. Easley shared his talents with LifeShare Blood Centers through countless hours of volunteer service. Read More...

A Gift that Truly Matters

It’s sometimes easy for us to get lost in the true meaning of the holiday season. We spend so much time worrying about what we should get those around us; we forget that others are worrying about the health of their loved ones and what we can do for them this time of year. Read More...

Jamaya's Journey

Marrow Match Needed to Save Teen's Life Read More...

SIT SIP SNACK After You Donate

Donors are the key to our mission here at LifeShare. Without their contributions, we could not aid in sustaining the community’s blood supply for the many patients in dire need of blood. Donors are the true heroes in our eyes, and keeping them safe is our priority. Read More...

LifeShare Blood Centers Celebrates 70 Years

With World War II raging in Europe and the Pacific, resources of all kinds were scarce. Dried plasma was desperately needed to support the war effort and the community. Despite war-induced shortages, the Shreveport Chamber of Commerce received a U.S. Government High Priority approval rating to obtain the building materials and equipment needed to open a blood center. Read More...

HHT- Nosebleeds and the Need for Blood

For many people a nosebleed may be an unusual occurrence, but for others it’s a symptom of a silent and potentially serious blood vessel disorder. Approximately one in 5,000 people have Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) but it is estimated that 90 percent are undiagnosed. The number is disturbingly high considering that proper diagnosis and screening can prevent some serious complications. Read More...